IPRA in the Chicago Reporter / by Invisible Institute

In June, the Chicago Reporter made public a video of police officer Marco Proano opening fire on a moving car containing six unarmed black teenagers at 95th and LaSalle streets. On July 29, the City Council approved a $360,000 settlement to three of the teens, two of whom were injured. What the intrepid Reporter didn’t know when they broke the story was that Proano had shot and killed a 19-year-old black youth named Niko Husband almost two years earlier on July 17, 2011.

The Chicago Independent Police Review Authority's practice of not including the names of officers involved in shootings in the information it releases is inconsistent with prevailing standards of transparency established by the 2014 Illinois Appellate Court decision in Kalven v. Chicago—a FOIA case in which Invisible Institute founder Jamie Kalven was the plaintiff—and adopted by the city in its policy for implementing that decision.

This is an easy fix. There are no legal or technical impediments to immediately adding the names to the investigation summaries. The Proano episode dramatizes what is at stake. Whether inadvertently or by design, essential public information was withheld from the public. IPRA should move immediately to make sure this never happens again.

Read our full story in the Chicago Reporter.

Chicago Police Department dashboard camera footage shows an officer opening fire on unarmed teenagers in a moving vehicle.

Chicago Police Department dashboard camera footage shows an officer opening fire on unarmed teenagers in a moving vehicle.